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Covering Up Half the Sky: Sexism in the Chinese Language

  • Cafe Sambal 259 Jiashan Road, Jiashan Market, Block A, #37 Xuhui District, Shanghai (map)
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This talk is organized by China Crossroads and co-hosted by GoEast and The Royal Asiatic Society.

The Chinese language, like all the world's languages, is rife with sexism. But due to its long history, its linguistic structure, and its complex character-based script, the Chinese language often exhibits sexism in surprising and subtle ways. This talk will explore the psychological role of language in perpetuating exist attitudes toward women in China.

Speaker: David Moser
Associate Dean, Yenching Academy of Peking University
Co-Host of the Sinica Podcast

Date: 4:15pm, Saturday, March 9, 2019
Location: Cafe Sambal (Jiashan Market)
Language: English
Price: 100 rmb / one drink

Register for China Crossroads: Covering Up Half the Sky: email Frank Tsai editor@shanghai-review.org

David Moser has been based in Beijing for over 25 years, and is active in academic and media circles. He was visiting scholar at Peking University in 1987-89, and Visiting Professor for five years at the Beijing Foreign Studies University, where he taught courses in Translation Theory and Psycholinguistics. He is now Associate Dean of the Yenching Academy at Peking University. He appears often on BBC radio as a commentator on the daily program Business Matters, and is also a frequent China analyst on Al Jazeera television. Professor Moser has worked at China Central Television (CCTV) in Beijing as a program advisor, translator, and host, and he continues to be active on Chinese television as a commentator in both Chinese and English on news shows such as CCTV Dialogue and World Insight. Moser is the author of A Billion Voices: China's Search for a Common Language (2016) published by Penguin, and is also a co-host of the Sinica Podcast, an influential China current affairs podcast widely listened to by journalists and China watchers throughout the world. He holds a Master's and Ph.D. in Chinese Studies from the University of Michigan, with specialization in Chinese Linguistics and Philosophy.


China Crossroads hosts talks on all topics related to China, including business, foreign policy, and other areas as they relate to China, the idea being that China is both already a "crossroads" of the world and itself at a "crossroads" in terms of its future global influence. For more information, contact Frank Tsai at editor@shanghai-review.org.